Pulse24 Interview

Admin
February 3, 2008

Source: Pulse24.com

Liz West: There’s certain things which are, that are very formulae Star Trek; what worked for the first Star Trek series. What do you think that the Enterprise adopted from that Star Trek formula and specifically, obviously your character, which is very similar to Spock?

Jolene Blalock: Yeah, the idea, well actually there’s two things, two points. The relationships between Spock, Bones and Kirk was one of…they weren’t born together, but they…or made to, their relationships sort of formed together. There were three different people from three different places, especially Spock, and they grew to love each other and they had such a sense of loyalty to each other that, in one of my favourite episodes, ‘Amok Time’ where Spock goes through Ponn Farr and he’s gotta actually duel Kirk for the woman because the woman chooses Kirk, you know to duel Spock. And Spock thinks that he actually kills Kirk and he’s like, you know I don’t want this woman, I’ve killed my captain, what have I done? You know what I mean? But there’s this loyalty. And then on the second…

Liz: How does that relate to the cast of the Enterprise?

Jolene: Because it’s the same thing, It’s Connor, Archer, and myself. Or, T’Pol. Sorry, I should rephrase that. It’s Connor, Scott, and myself. Our three characters coming together and learning how to work together and many times it’s kind of like the jocks against the chick, and it just seems like that relationship. They’re just giving me a hard time, always taking the piss out on me, we’ve actually come to develop quite a relationship, quite a loyalty with each other and we’re always constantly surprising each other which is…yeah I love that about a growing and changing relationship. And them actually becoming to like me and making me feel welcome. On a second note, Gene Roddenberry had an original concept for the Original Star Trek which was…I remember when he did his pilot of Star Trek, it was called ‘The Cage’. It was done in black and white and then the studios made him re do it so it was half black and white, half colour. But he did this interview, talking about ‘The Cage’ and his concept of wanting Star Trek and it wasn’t about…because it was in the midst of Westerns; the good guy versus the bad guy, and good overcomes evil. His concept was about making more about relationships, rather than just the journey and the adventure. So he took a multiracial cast, because you know, just like on the dollar bill, ‘united we stand, divided we fall.’ So he wanted to do away with all the racial boundaries, it’s the world together, coming together and what can we accomplish together and what can we learn from each other and our different backgrounds and our different cultures, and set out on a mission, set out to literally the middle of nowhere, what can we learn and what can we discover from species outside of ourselves. And it actually makes us feel very big individually, and it makes us very small in the whole span of things.

Liz: Wow, you know a lot. Okay. Now what do you think about the Enterprise, how is it reinventing, what is it bringing that we’re not used to seeing on Star Trek; humour of you know, a dog? What is it?

Jolene: Sex.

Liz: Lot’s of sex?

Jolene: No, it’s like Archer waking up in his quarters and he’s got no shirt on, or the decontamination chamber, there’s body parts, body touching and actually today we were doing a scene where Linda and I and Dominic are all in our underwear because we’re coming back from this mission, it’s the decontamination chamber again just without the rubbing. And there’s a lot, it’s so much more contemporary, it’s going for a much wider audience, I mean let alone the cult following which are the Trekkies, which you know I’m right there. But, say you’re just like me, and you grew up on the Oirignal Star Trek or whatever time of your life and you got lost along the way. Now you can pick up with this without missing a beat, because it’s in the beginning. So it’s actually very wise of the writers to turn it around like that.

Liz: And tell me a little bit about the process, like what make-up do you wear and what they put on you to change, to transform you. See you really don’t look anything like your character right now.

Jolene: No, nothing at all, nothing at all…which works really well because when I take on that form; I’ve got the ears, the wig, the make-up, the uniform. I’m actually hard pressed to find myself in the mirror, and I’m going ‘okay, where are you, where are you?’ But it works for the character because the character work you embody, and once I’m in the part, I am T’Pol and that’s actually really fortunate to have that. It takes about a little under two hours to get into full wardrobe. They do the standard issue Vulcan wig and they tattoo the eyebrows to give me bigger eyebrows and then we’ve got the uniform and of course the ears. So two hours, it’s not bad.

Liz: No…And do you have a favourite part of…the bridge is such an icon of the Star Trek series, is there a part of it, that when you first walked on it…?

Jolene: Actually, you know what…when I first got casted for this job, you know, my agent called me over to meet me at a café and I walk into this café and I see the head agent sitting at the table and I am gong, ‘okay, what’s this all about? I’m either in trouble or there’s some good news.’ So anyway I walk up and they just smile and I start jumping up and down in this café. And that was pretty cool but I was still waiting for the phone call to come of we’ve found the right chick. And you know what I mean? It’s so funny because you work so hard, you know every day to finally get a break and finally get a job you get the job and you still don’t believe that you got it. You know what I mean?

Liz: Yes.

Jolene: So not until I walked on the set for the first day in a full uniform…I looked at that stage and said damn straight it’s mine, and I owned it from that moment forward. So I’ve got a very special moment with the bridge right there and as far as shooting, my favourite place is the Captain’s Ready Room, coz it’s small and everybody hits their head on the beams but it’s kind of fun to go haaaa haaa and laugh at it when they hit their head.

Liz: That’s great.

She’s a talented actress! =)

[nggallery id=1]